What is sexting?

Sexting is when someone sends or receives a sexually explicit text, image or video on their mobile phone.

Usually sent in a text message, sexting involves sending or receiving naked pictures or ‘nudes’, underwear shots, sexual or dirty pictures, rude text messages or videos.


It’s very easy for sexting to happen, even with someone you think is your friend, boyfriend, girlfriend or someone you’re friends with online.


Once you press send, you lose control of your image – it could appear on social media or even on porn sites. Your parents, teachers, grandparents and even future employers could see it.

If you are worried 
about a child…

Report by calling

Parents Against CSE 0113 240 5226

Report by calling

Crimestoppers 0800 555 111

Report by calling

Merseyside Police on 101

Report by calling

999 if you know someone is
in serious danger

Things to think about before sexting

  • When you send an indecent photo or video it can be posted anywhere on the internet, including social networking sites or porn sites
  • Do not send any image that you wouldn’t want your parents, peers or teachers to see
  • Even if you trust someone entirely, someone else may use their phone and see the content
  • If you use a webcam or app such as Snapchat where the image is only available for a set amount of time, the person can screen shot and can also download other apps to screen shot the image without you being notified
  • Do not feel like you need to ‘sext’ in order to impress someone else as it could have the opposite effect and you could be branded as something that you are not

Report by calling

Child line on 0800 1111

Report by calling

999 if you know someone is in serious danger

Report by calling

Child line on 0800 1111

Report by visiting

www.ceop.police.uk

Advice

What if someone asks me to send them a photo?

It may be the case that someone requests that you send them a photo by using guilt-inducing tactics. For example they may say “I sent you my photo, now it’s your turn” but this is wrong – it is a form of emotional blackmail. These individuals are not entitled to anything from you and it is wrong for them to try and make you feel guilty.

It could be that they threaten to post your indecent images online if you do not send them more, this can be frightening and you may feel trapped however you should talk to a trusted adult who will be able to help.

If someone keeps asking you for a picture, tell your trusted adult and tell the person requesting photos to stop. You can send them a Zipit pic from Chidline’s app. Zipit helps you get flirty chat back on the right track. It’s packed with killer comebacks and top tips to help you stay in control of your chat game.

If someone continues to ask for photos, you and your trusted adult can you can report them to CEOP.

If you are worried 
about a child…

Report by calling

Crimestoppers 0800 555 111

Report by calling

Merseyside Police on 101

How can I stop someone from sexting me?

Some mobile phones and messenger apps such as WhatsApp allow you to easily block numbers, however, with others it is slightly trickier, so you should always be extremely careful about who you give out your mobile phone number to.

Changing your mobile phone number or buying a new SIM card is another option available if blocking the number does not work – ask your parent or carer to help you with this.

You can report adults who are pressuring you into sending them indecent images through the CEOP website because if you are under 18 they are breaking the law.

What if I am sent a sexual image?
If you receive a sexual image or video, do not share it with anybody else. Put yourself in that persons shoes and think how you would feel if somebody else saw a photo of you.

If you are worried 
about a child…

Report by calling

Crimestoppers 0800 555 111

Report by calling

Merseyside Police on 101

Other
Organisations

To report CSE call Merseyside Police on 101  or Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111. In an emergency dial 999.

To report CSE call Merseyside Police on 101  or Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111. In an emergency dial 999.